Today’s News in: Rip – Find the Magic Key

Green swatch— Tuma attemps to outwit is his old lover, Llanka, but he reckons without her love for Sumataniki or the wisdom of the years since they last met. —

“You want me to spy for you?”
“I wouldn’t put it that way. We were lovers once.”
Llanka laughed sarcastically and grinned at Tuma. She had made her mind up.
“Alright. Where’s this comfortable room you talked about?”
Tuma led her toward the servant’s chamber. On the other side of a heavy door, she heard the unmistakable growl of an Anakuna, the wolf-men that had dogged the history of Peroturnaka.
“They live here now?” she asked Tuma.
“Only one.”
“The leader? The female with the gold earrings?”
“Ha! No. She died centuries ago. A distant descendant. They’re few now and they will soon die out completely. They’re stuck here. Their flying carts – they call them space ships – constantly break down. Anyway, they still help me and soon I won’t even need them. Don’t worry. You’re safe. Here we are.”
Tuma opened a door and watched as she lay upon the luxurious bed. Indeed, her silky hair, when splayed out on the blue pillow reminded him of the Princess, whom he had felt forced to kill. He bitterly rued the day, but sought to sink its memory forever in his kisses upon Llanka’s soft skin.
As he kissed her bared breasts and forced himself into her, Tuma whispered, “Puki! Puki!”
Llanka bit her tongue and stared at the ceiling.

Rip-Find the Magic Key: 2nd longest Western novel at 1 M+ words. Subscribe bit.ly/LazloFerran | Buy Vol 1 bit.ly/ripvol1 | Understand more bit.ly/inforip

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Today’s News in: Rip – Find the Magic Key

Green swatch— Prince Sumataniki holds the top of the hill in a great battle but Quytur is out for his blood. Only B’katan is close enough to defend his prince. —

Sumataniki raised his sword to ward off any blow from Quytur, but when he saw the black barrel of the gun, he almost lost hope. His sword seemed to waver in his hand. He closed his eyes and whispered:
“God help me now!”
B’katan seemed to see everything in slow-motion, despite the rapid gallop of his lamaca. The soldiers fighting around Quytur and Sumataniki were fighting for their lives; they didn’t see how close the titans, the Prince and General, were. B’katan yelled again, “Save the Prince!” and brandished his spear, but to no avail. He watched, horrified, as Quytur raised his gun to fire. At the last moment, B’katan made a decision. He swerved his lamaca and forced it to a desperate lunge with his heels. The poor animal leaped over several bloody corpses and landed in Quytur’s line of fire.
Quytur swore and pulled the trigger again. This time it clicked, and the barrel jerked upward. If it hadn’t, he may well have still hit Sumataniki, but B’katan’s lamaka stumbled on the bloody ground and fell forward. Quytur’s shot slammed into the beast’s neck, bringing from it one, brief bleat, before it fell to its knees and tipped B’katan into the growing pile of bodies.
“Damn you!” Quytur raged, throwing away his gun and drawing his sword. He thrust the blade through B’katan’s back, stepped over the lifeless body and strode up to the Prince with his blade raised for the first blow.

Rip-Find the Magic Key: 2nd longest Western novel at 1 M+ words. Subscribe bit.ly/LazloFerran | Buy Vol 1 bit.ly/ripvol1 | Understand more bit.ly/inforip

How to Write a Good Book – Post 5. Varying the Pace

pen5So you have your plot of Rudolph’s adventures all worked out and you know where the climax and twist will be. Now you are considering writing the climax and want to know how to show tension when Rudolph can’t get the tractor down a narrow alleyway, or gets stuck in a snowdrift. So how do you show the tension?

It’s not as easy as you might think!

Action Words and Expletives

The first rule is to use more action words when you are writing action sequences. These are words like ‘ripped,’ ‘spun,’ ‘yelled,’ ‘wrenched,’ and ‘panted.’

Here is an example. See how this sentence sounds quite calm.

– He knew he needed to get through the door. He put down the axe and walked up to the door. He pulled on the handle and it opened. He went thought the opening and all was well.

That definitely lacks tension. Let’s try it again:

– He had to get through the door. He only had seconds left! He threw his axe down, spun round and leaped toward the door. Grabbing the handle, he pulled and pulled but the door wouldn’t budge. Using all his strength, he gave it one last almighty heave and wrenched the door open. The wood cracked and splintered as the lock broke, and he was through!
“What’s the problem Rudolph?” Santa yelled.
“The door! It’s bloody stuck!”

Okay, so I went a bit over the top there; it’s twice as long. But it’s much more exciting.

Notice the use of words like ‘grabbing,’ ‘cracked.’

Also notice saying ‘had to’ instead of ‘knew he needed to.’ Forget about considered thought in tight situations. People just act and think later when they are desperate. This is one place where we definitely don’t need to know what the hero is thinking.

Also note the use of an expletive (swear word) by Rudolph. You might not want to use expletives in your writing but it’s a fact that people swear a lot when under pressure. Leave swear words out and you risk losing realism.

Short Sentences

For the last reason above, short sentences are good in action sequences. We want simple action, and short sentences tend to increase the pace.

Time

Another trick is to use time. If the hero is not only fighting against an evil adversary or obstinate door, but also against the clock, this will dramatically increase tension.

I used this a great deal in Ordo Lupus and the Temple Gate.

Adversity or Obstacles

Elements of adversity of obstacle can also add tension. In the example above the door wouldn’t open easily and he had to wrench it open. Small accidents can also increase tension. He needs a key to unlock the door but he drops it, as people do when tense or in a hurry. Both accidents and obstacles also prolong the tension, which also helps create tension.

Use of Commas

The use of less commas during action sequences can increase tension, but this is a technique not all authors employ. If you try it, you still need to observe good grammar rules.

A Word of Warning about Length of Description

As you probably noticed in my example above, quite often action sequences can make the prose longer. For this reason, you will need to allow a bit more space for describing action, perhaps as much as 50% more space. But on the other hand, if you use short sentences carefully and avoid any description of inner feeling, you can sometimes keep the prose in action scenes as short as elsewhere.

Slowing the Pace

It may sound crazy, but sometimes you will want to slow the pace!

You can’t have climactic scenes throughout the whole book. This would be exhausting to read, and would ignore the whole point of climaxes. But you may want more than one climax. In The Devil’s Own Dice I knew there would be a big battle in the middle of the story. Inevitably this has to be very tense and a climax of some sort. But I didn’t want it to be the final climax. This made things tricky. I got round it by making the lead up to the battle quite leisurely and keeping the tension high afterwards. I also had a strong ‘insight’ scene after the battle, so that we see a previous love affair in detail and how it affected the main character. This kept the pace up, because of the tension of an affair, but also allowed the reader a bit of a contrast to battle. I had to make sure the final climax was even more exciting, but on the whole I think the reader feels they got a bonus, rather than a let down

Using Chapter Breaks and Scene Switching

I put these 2 factors together because they sometimes amount to the same thing.

Because you will want the climax somewhere near the end of the book, each chapter should, on the whole, be more gripping than the last. This drags the reader along and won’t let them put the book down. For this reason, you should normally end each chapter on a cliff-hanger. That is, they should either be just about to learn something, or have just seen some action but not know the outcome. This will make the reader want to turn the next page.

If the book has a large cast and a complex arena of action such as the invasion of Earth in my science fiction book Worlds Like Dust, you might try switching between different areas of action, either at section breaks or chapter breaks, rather than trying to describe it all simultaneously. Allowing yourself to describe one piece of action completely before switching to another increases tension, because the reader is wondering in the back of their mind what has happened to so-and-so in the other scene. Tolkien does this brilliantly in Lord of the Rings. You must handle continuity very carefully when you do this.

So, in conclusion, to vary pace, use:

  1. Action Words and Expletives
  2. Short Sentences
  3. Time
  4. Adversity or Obstacles
  5. Reduced Number of Commas
  6. Chapter Breaks and Scene Switching

Join me for the final part of this series 6. Editing in two weeks’ time.

Let me know what you think of my tutorials by commenting below: