The World is Broken: Rip – Find the Magic Key

“Lots of cool action and drew me well in.” – AHF Magazine.

You can buy Rip Volume 1 (2016) for $4.99 on Amazon, or subscribe.

Let me download free chapters and subscribe: http://bit.ly/LazloFerran

Let me buy Rip on Amazon now!

There is a RIP in space and time. Om and Bri are trapped. All humanity; wiped out after seven cycles of destruction, Unless Om and Bri can unite to find the source of the rip.

A curtain of rainbow light shimmers and two people see their lives shift, in this tense, epic thriller. Om and Bri gradually become aware that they have met before – in previous lives. They begin to recall a mission that started with the discovery of Iron in ancient Atlantis. A gravitational rip was triggered by the Ischians, and water became impure, causing the gradual loss of memory and the Cup, a grail to hold the Holy blood of the first tree.

The blind Seer predicts that Earth’s health will never be restored until the Cup, the Holy Grail of legend, has been restored.

It’s their last life, their last chance. Om and Bri must find their way back through the rip to Atlantis, and to the cave where the last Val-yr, vampire priests, wait.

But the Cup needs a Key.

“Tolkien like epic with a touch of sci-fi.”

7 worlds. 7 lives. 7 chances for Om and Bri to save Earth.

Continue reading

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Get 2 eBooks and the December Radio Paperback for $16!

Get 2 eBooks and the December Radio Paperback for $16!

Now in UK too!

December Radio cover

December Radio cover

To celebrate December Radio’s release I have arranged a bargain offer for you! The paperback ( click here to see on Amazon ) is available to order in USA and UK book stores, which is by far the cheapest option.
Click here for my other books at Amazon.

List of book stores stocking December Radio

If you can’t get to a book store, you can still get 2 eBooks free by ordering December Radio paperback online at Amazon or Barnesandnoble.com. Simply email me the receipt!

But if you are near a book store, here’s the deal for 2 eBooks:

1. Call or go into any book store in the USA or Waterstones in the UK and order or buy my book (B&N: $16.19, Waterstones: £15.50). This is the cheapest option but you can order online at Amazon or Barnes & Noble and pay delivery costs if you wish!

December Radio by Lazlo Ferran. ISBN-13: 978-1942981473

My other eBooks are priced at up to $9.99 and you can choose any of these formats: pdf, ePub, pdb, lit, html, kindle format. So you can’t lose!

2. And either:

Go to my Facebook page and post a selfie of you with the book there with the title “I bought December Radio” (or on your Instagram or twitter page) and message me.

Or email me a photo of your receipt: lazloferran@gmail.com

Don’t forget to specify which 2 books and formats you want!

Read Chapter One of December Radio in FREE eBook Inchoate: (Short Stories Volume I): on Amazon or Google Play (pdf version only), or start reading the preview at top of the right hand column.

NB. I am sorry but the December Radio eBook is not included in this offer.

That’s it! Have fun.

Continue reading

My new book December Radio is out!

December Radio cover

December Radio cover

December Radio is out on Amazon as a Kindle eBook here! http://bit.ly/decradi

The paperback will follow on 29th January. Watch the trailer below the description.

Description

What would have happened if the Nazi’s developed ‘THE BOMB’ first?
Based on real events. If German scientists had developed nuclear fission first, the world would be changed.
What if? Actually, German scientists were far ahead of the United States in creating the first atom bomb. It was only through the daring exploits of brave men and women that the US succeeded in obtaining the first nuclear weapon and saved the world from being subject to German Nazi rule. Hitler, driving his scientists to extraordinary means, almost achieved domination over all mankind. The thought of such a ruler is chilling, yet could well have come to past.

Based on actual events, Ferran draws the reader into the frightening concept that such a possibility did in fact take place and a few men and women were faced with the ultimate sacrifice. Could such a possibility exist today?

Grab a copy of Ferran’s best seller today: http://bit.ly/decradi

Attack Hitler’s Bunker is FREE! 8-12 January

To celebrate the release of December Radio, I am offering Attack Hitler’s Bunker! FREE here! http://bit.ly/amzattack

Watch the trailer below the description.

Description

Rudolf Eineger was left with his finger inside a dead body. Repulsed, he withdrew it and wiped it on the black SS tunic.

Richard Earlgood, maverick RAF fighter pilot, and Michael Dorfmann, an ambitious Luftwaffe double-agent, plan a daring daylight attack on Adolf Hitler using Hurricane fighters, piggy-backing on 4-engine Stirling bombers to reach the almost completed… impregnable… Führer Bunker in this WWII fiction book.

Anna Styles, a Station X decoder, had a romance with Dorfmann at Oxford and is being forced to ‘handle’ the double-agent. She still loves Dorfmann but she has fallen for Richard too. This single raid to bomb Hitler’s Bunker could win the war, but only one man can win Anna’s heart.

Most of Hitler’s staff simply don’t believe such a raid is possible but one ruthless SS officer will stop at nothing to catch Dorfmann and defeat the British.

Men, machines and passions will be stretched to the limits,

in a raid…

that will shape…

History.

Attack Hitler’s Bunker! The RAF secret raid to bomb Hitler’s Berlin Bunker that never happened – probably.

Fans of 633 Squadron The Dam Busters, Valkyrie, The Eagle has Landed Where Eagles Dare or even the WWII simulation game War Thunder will love this white-hot roller-coaster wartime action thriller through the streets of Wartime Berlin on a bombing mission that will make your hair stand on end!

Grab a copy today! http://bit.ly/amzattack

Lotus Free and Attack Hitler’s Bunker down to 99 cents for Independence Day weekend!!

Short post this weekend because I am hard at work on the June Newsletter. This month: no less than 3 chances to win free books and one of those gives you the chance to spend an hour with me onlie for an interview and keep a copy of the interview to share with your friends! There is still time to sign up for the Newsletter here – If you sign up before Friday 10 July, I will send you a copy of this month’s Newsletter. After that, no dice!

Two other things to mention for this Independence Day in the USA:

Lotus: (Enter the Labyrinth - Satan's Fatal Puzzle)

Lotus: (Enter the Labyrinth – Satan’s Fatal Puzzle)

Lotus
Lotus is Free from today 3 July until 7 July at 8am EST.
Lotus is an encounter between a soul and Satan. Satan uses every trick possible to torture the soul, who is reincarnated at Satan’s whim but eventually Game Theory proves the undoing of one of them! Click here to get the deal!

 

 

 

 

Attack Hitler's Bunker!

Attack Hitler’s Bunker!

Attack Hitler’s Bunker!
This wartime thriller has just been accepted for translation and distribution in China so to celebrate, I am offering it in an Amazon Countdown Deal. This means it will drop to 99 cents from 8am on 4 July and gradually climb back up to its usual price of $2.99 by 11 July 12am PST. So hurry because it will only be at 99 cents for a day or two! Click here to get the deal!

WW2 Book Trailer: How much gasoline to reach Berlin in 1943?

I see that BP (British Petroleum) stocks are up in the UK and USA so maybe now is a good time to invest in petrochemicals.

Fuel has always been expensive, and more importantly during wartime, heavy. In September 1943, when the heroes of Attack Hitler’s Bunker! were trying a precision bombing attack on Hitler’s Bunker in Berlin, that latest Hawker Hurricane, the MKII, required all of its 97 gallons of high-octane fuel, 34.5 gallons each in wing tanks and 28 in a small tank ahead of the cockpit, to achieve a range of 600 miles. It could carry 2 x 500 lb canisters or bombs but would barely be able to reach Berlin from Norfolk, let alone carry out the attack and return.

Drop tanks were not yet available for Allied aircraft and in fact even the German Luftwaffe had limited use for them. Not until October, did the first P-47 Thunderbolts arrive in the European Theatre of War, equipped with drop tanks. But P-47s were to big to negotiate the streets of Berlin in the sort of precision attack required to hit the Bunker and the attack had to be made in September.

What could the answer be?

Richard Earlgood comes up with an almost unique solution; piggy-backing the Hurricane fighters on 4-engine Short Stirling bombers. I say ‘almost’ unique because Short had achieve the same thing before the War with the Mayo Flying Boat. In this way, the Hurricanes could, in theory, reach Veluwemeer in Holland, a large body of water, which had a strong resistance presence, from Berlin.

The Stirling could carry roughly the weight of a Hurricane in bombs and, suitably modified, carry a Hurricane on a framework above its fuselage. For the Hurricane, this arrangement would not be unique either. The Hurricat had been a short-lived version of the fighter modified to be launched by catapult from cargo ships in order to defend them against U-boats.

This all looks great on paper to the Air Ministry but, in practice, the fully-loaded fighters prove too heavy for the bombers to take off and the Hurricanes cannot manoeuvre or make the distance with the fully loaded canisters.

So what was the answer?

You will have to read Attack Hitler’s Bunker! to find out!

Here is the Book Trailer Video. I hope you like it! Please let me have your feedback.

Duxford Air Show, Sunday 2014 featuring two Avro Lancasters in formation

If you love aircraft, especially old aircraft, you will love this post but if not, look away! This is necessarily going to be a long post! I went to Duxford on the Sunday, drawn by the prospect of seeing two Avro Lancasters in formation. As all flight buffs will know, this is probably the last time more than one Avro Lancaster will be seen flying together and the crowds were huge. I arrived before 9 am and the queues were already long. By the time I left, I knew that many hadn’t got in. I saw people standing on bridges, miles down the motorway, hoping to see something. They probably weren’t disappointed.

Apart from the First World War crates, most aircraft were fast enough that their displays were spread over miles of the countryside around Duxford. Indeed, one of the highlights was a display but a Boeing 727, which has recently retired from passenger carrying and been converted to an environmental disaster response unit by a consortium of large oil companies. The red and silver jet was piloted by a first time diplay pilot who clearly had no idea about constraint because he proceeded to come in low over the airfield many times and climb away with both engines roaring at somewhere near full power. He was not that far from the onlookers, possibly flouting UK air traffic laws, but who could blame him?

The two Lancasters came early on, at about 3.15, and rumbled elegantly back and forth over the grass runway for us all to enjoy. Two Spitfires and a Hurricane, which turned up unexpectedly, joined them at the last moment.

I went for a short walk and took a turn in a Battle of Britain flight simulator, along with about ten other people. The simulated flight was of a Bf109E. The bumps and tight turns were faithfully reproduced but, of course, we felt no G-Force.

I also found the Blenheim Society hangar and spoke to one of the engineers who has been working to get the crashed Bristol Blenheim ready for flight again, this time with a Mark I short nose. If you have read Ordo Lupus and the Temple Gate, you will know that the later Mark IV features in the book.

I also attended a re-enacted Bomber Command briefing where I asked how on earth they launched the pigeons, which were used to carry coded information about a downed bombers location back to England. They told me that the pigeons were kept in biscuit tins while in flight and only released after the crash landing or ditching

Shortly after, we were treated to a display of American Naval power from WWII; a Grumman Hellcat, a Chance Vought Corsair and a Grumman Bearcat. While the two former aircraft rumbled slowly back and forth, the Bearcat executed a dazzling display in the background, sometimes going into loops which took it way beyond our vision, up into the clouds.

A Consolidated PBY Catalina (see photos below) took off twice and chugged around, keeping its nose wheel off the ground for an extended landing run, just to compete with the B-17 pilot who made a speciality of this maneouvre, we were told.

Then the B-17 Sally B fired up, sending clouds of black/brown smoke into the air. This B-17, actually a G model, distinguished by the chin gun, was painted to look like Memphis Belle, the first B-17 to survive 25 missions and return to the states, as filmed in the eponymously entitled film. Still in those colours, she rumbled past the crowd and took off for a short, but elegant display, showing her wide belly to the crowd each time.

I happened to be looking for lunch when I saw a Sally B stand and enquired whether I could actually get inside the aircraft. To my complete surprise, I was able to get a ticket to go inside for only £10; apparently a special deal for the day. I paid my money and climbed inside this old aircraft. If you want to see the photographs inside B-17 Sally-B (Memphis Belle) and find out more, take a look at my post two weeks ago.

Just before I sought lunch, I made a quick tour of the military vehicle hanger. If you like this sort of thing, you won’t be disappointed. I saw a Jagdpanther, a Conqueror and an Honest John missile launcher (I had a Dinky Toys one as a kid), to mention a few.

The hanger containing American aircraft had an SR-71 blackbird, a B-29 Superfortress, another B-17G a U-2 and many other interesting aircraft.

Most of these aircraft feature in the photographs below. I apologise about the layout but I have struggled all day to get it as good as this; I didn’t know that the WordPress ‘Gallery’ mode for posts does absolutely nothing and took a while to find out that you can’t easily fit three photos on one line. Anyway, enjoy the photographs, click to enlarge, and please leave a comment.

B-17G Flying Fortress Sally-B (aka Memphis Belle)

If you want to see the photographs inside B-17 Sally-B (Memphis Belle) and find out more, take a look at my post two weeks ago.

Handley Page Hastings

Handley Page Hastings port engine and undercarriage detail. Hastings served as transports at the end of WWII and during the Berlin Airlift.

Avro York Cockpit

Avro York Cockpit. These two were used in the Berlin Airlift and were a development of the Avro Lancaster. Unfortunately, my photos of the exterior are not good.

DeHavilland Comet

DeHavilland Comet 4, one of the last, serving on Dan Air route to Alicante until 1973. I flew on a Dan Air Comet in 1973, but not this one. They were noisy and shook a lot!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Airspeed Ambassador

Airspeed Ambassador. Anybody who loves airliners is going to love this album; not my sort of thing really but its nice to take a trip down memory lane!

 

 

Airspeed Ambassador Cockpit

Airspeed Ambassador Cockpit

Bristol Britannia front

Bristol Britannia front

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bristol Britannia engines

Bristol Britannia engines

Bristol  Britannia cockpit

Bristol Britannia cockpit

 

 

 

 

 

 

VIckers VC10 Trident

VIckers VC10 Trident

Vickers VC10 cockpit

Vickers VC10 cockpit

 

 

 

 

 

 

VC10 Engines

VC10 engines. This would have been your view (minus the red covers) when you stepped off the aircraft at some hot holiday destination.

BAC111cockpit

BAC 111 cockpit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TSR2 nose section. Such a shame this beautiful aircraft was cancelled by the Government.

TSR2 nose section. Such a shame this beautiful aircraft was cancelled by the Government.

Grumman Wildcat

Grumman Wildcat. This and the next sequence of photos were taken in the ‘Restoration’ hangar.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hawker Fury

Hawker Fury with a long way to go until it flies.

Supermarine Spitfire

Very tatty looking Spitfire.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fairy Firefly

Fairy Firefly. Two are being restored, one to flying condition and the other for museum display only.

sr71 cockpit

An SR-71 Blackbird cockpit. The pilot of one of these gave guided tours on the day and I have his autograph. He said the crew had to stay in the cockpit for 30 minutes after landing because the canopy and fuselage were far too hot to touch.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SR-71 fuselage; Elegant but menacing.

SR-71 fuselage; elegant but menacing.

b17G

Nose of the museum’s static display B-17G Flying Fortress. The chin gun has been removed for restoration.

Ball turret of the B-17G.

Ball turret of the B-17G.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tail  turret of B-17G.

Tail turret of B-17G.

B-29 Superfortress tail section.

B-29 Superfortress tail section.

 

 

 

 

 

 

B-29 engine

B-29 Superfortress port outer engine. These had magnesium parts which were prone to melt and set light to the firewall between the engine and the fuel tank, which soon sent the aircraft up in flames!

B-29 Starboard cupola

B-29 Superfortress starboard cupola. The B-29 had remote-controlled guns and the operator would sight his targets through this cupola. Inside, you can just see the upper cupola.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

B-29 Superfortress belly gun.

B-29 Superfortress belly gun.

B-29 bombsight

B-29 Superfortress. View from outside nose of bombsight.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

c

B-29 Superfortress. View from right of cockpit

 

 

B-29 Superfortress. View up though nose.

B-29 Superfortress. View up though nose.

 

 

 

 

 

 

B-29 starboard undercarrriage

B-29 Superfortress starboard undercarriage detail.

B-29 undercarriage, looking up

B-29 Superfortress starboard undercarriage bay, looking up. The motor is to the right and forward.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

B-29 starboard undercarriage looking up and back

B-29 Superfortress starboard undercarriage bay, looking up and to the rear.

B-52 nose

Nose of B-52 Stratofortress. Those still in service have been upgraded to serve on until 2040, which will mean they will be the first front-line aircraft to complete 90 years of service!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

B-17 Sally B taxiing

B-17G Sally B taxing. As you can see, Sally B is still painted to represent Memphis Belle, which she portrayed in the film of same name. I went inside Sally B so read on if you want to see the photos.

Sally B flying.

Sally B flying.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

B-17G Flying Fortress Sally-B (aka Memphis Belle) If you want to see the photographs inside B-17 Sally-B (Memphis Belle) and find out more, take a look at my post two weeks ago.

2 Lancasters flying together.

The privately owned Canadian and RAF Lancaster flying together in formation. The Canadian Lancaster was flown over for a season of displays because the RAF Lanc is due for a long servicing dismantlement and this was the last chance for them to be seen together before that. With increasing fuel and insurance costs, this sight may well never be seen again (at least with real Lancasters!)

What keeps you writing?

This week: sneak preview and what keeps you writing?

Sneak Preview
This week it’s from the new project provisonally entitled December Radio a sci-fi World War II story.

The following scene takes place in an aeronautical centrifuge in Cologne. Remember those? I seem to remember they featured in a few 60s films and as a very young boy, one of these left a lasting impression on me. In fact the scene has such a powerful effect on me personally – it almost disturbs me in the same way OCD does sometimes – that I would love to pin down the film I originally watched and see it again. The Gerry Anderson film Doppelganger, sometimes called Journey to the Far Side of the Sun, may well have been the one. It is reputed to have a centrifuge scene in it and the only other film I know if is the Roger Moor Bond film Moonraker, but this would have been too late for me to have affected me so powerfully and yet be a vague memory. If anybody knows of any other film where a man has trouble surviving a centrifuge, please get in touch.

December Radio
Copyright © 2013 by Lazlo Ferran
All Rights Reserved

The cage-wall began to blur. He began to feel nauseous.
“Is 3 Gees fine?”
“Yes. I can feel the pressure in my head.”
“It’s lack of pressure.” After a pause the voice continued, “Still alright?”
“Yes. Increase to… the next Gee.”
“4 Gees. Increasing to 4 Gees now. That’s 4 Gees. How does it feel? Take your time…”
“It… feels… tough. I feel a bit… sick.” Robert was struggling to stay conscious.
“That’s normal. How about 5 Gees?”
“Alr-right.”
“Going up to 5 Gees… now. You’re doing superbly. 5 Gees now.”
“God! How do I…” Robert had to close his eyes for a moment. The cage-wall was just a blur and seeing it was just adding to the dizziness he felt overwhelming him. It was frightening him slightly.
“Are you alright, Robert? Shall we stop?”
“No… no, it’s… alright. Just a little longer. Is this the top Gee?”
“No. Six is the highest. You want to try it?”
“No. But do it.” Robert knew he was being tested. Priller told him he was the best and he wasn’t going to let his commander down.
“Up to 6 Gees.”
“Oh! Aewargh-…” Robert passed out.
“Robert? Robert? I am going to stop if you don’t respond. Okay, stopping. 5 Gees, 4 Gees, 3
Gees, 2 Gees, 1 Gee, stopped. Okay, let’s get him out.”

What Keeps you Writing?
I am often asked this. I guess the question has two main answers for me:
1. What motivates me in the first place?
2. Why don’t I just give up, since I am making very little money and it’s extremely labour-intensive?

Both are easy to answer.

1. My first attempt at a novel was while traveling to Egypt on a cruise ship when I was 19. Now, it’s not what you think! In actual fact I had just dropped out of of an Aeronautical Engineering course at Queen Mary College and decided to catch the Magic Bus to Athens. From there, the plan was to go through Iran and on to Bombay. In fact I was too curious about Africa to stick so entirely to my plan and the bus was Hell on Wheels. So I jumped off in Athens and caught a boat – a DFDS Seaways ship. I was travelling third class – the swimming pool was a bilge tank in the bottom of the ship, we slept on deck after the other passengers had all gone to bed, meals were only served to the first fifty or so of us arriving in the ‘canteen’ and entertainment was a movie shown on one of those plastic screens in the ‘canteen’. I well remember translating El Cid (a movie about a Christian beating Moors) to a canteen full of Muslim Egyptians. They were bemused and I was worried for my life!
It was natural in such a place, given that my normal hobby/career of writing and composing music had to be put on hold for the journey – that I would turn to something similiar; writing. The novel was abandoned after about one hundred pages. I thought it was awful (in fact I recently discovered some of the MS and it’s not too bad!).
When I left the music industry permanently in 1994, it would seem natural that I returned to writing. In fact it took nearly ten years to give it ago. Maybe it was lack of confidence, maybe I was just plain dried-up creatively. In any case, my first efforts met with some positive comments so I continued. I don’t think i could live without creating something. It’s just in my DNA, my bones or my psychological makeup. Whichever way you put it, I just have to write. I think its’ cathartic – probably a way of releasing the huge amount of anger I felt every day as a child and which built up over the years until I could contain it no longer.

2. The second answer is that people seem to like what I write. It ‘resonates’ with them. If it was just my anger that drove me; my anger about the inhumanity in the world today, anger about inequality, anger about ignorance, then it would just be vanity writing and I couldn’t bare that. In about 2006 I was approached by a publisher who wanted me to come to a seminar at their offices in Milton Keynes. I drove up there in a rain-storm and sat down with about a dozen other writers. It quickly became apparent that this was all about vanity publishing; we put up the money for marketing and production, and the publisher reaps the financial rewards. Some of the titles I saw hardly bare thinking about. I was out of there within ten minutes.
Recently I have started getting reviews from people I have never met – good reviews and these have really inspired me to keep going; to try harder. I think at the end of the day, a good review from somebody who has paid for your book and doesn’t even know you, is the best tonic of all. So the second answer is; good reviews.

I’ve given my answers to what keeps me writing? I would love to hear from you. What keeps you writing? Please comment below. If I like your comment, you can make a more detailed post about your reason on my blog.